Marine Damage Control

Electronics – Electrical – Machinery

First aid after fire damage can be carried out by ship crew. 

  What to do Action
Step 1 Ventilate out remaining smoke when it is safe Open hatches or doors
Suck out smoke through temporary ventilation
Be aware of soot, humidity and contamination following the smoke
Step 2 Get an overview Decrease the damage by sealing off assumed non-affected areas
Cover sensitive equipment and machinery
Step 3 Damage control In the event of a cable fire or oil / chemical fire is it necessary to prevent corrosion
Step 4 Action and preservation Prevent corrosion by first aid
Spray down all sensitive equipment and machinery with preservation oil soon as possible
If possible lower humidity below 35% RH

Electronics – Electrical – Machinery

First aid after fire on stainless steel can be carried out by the ship crew. 

Step 1 Ventilate out remaining smoke when it is safe Open hatches or doors
Suck out smoke through temporary ventilation
Be aware of soot, humidity and contamination following the smoke
Step 2 Get an overview Decrease the damage by sealing off assumed non-affected areas
Cover sensitive equipment and machinery
Step 3 Damage control In the event of a cable fire or oil / chemical fire is it necessary to prevent corrosion
Step 4 Action and preservation Hose down with freshwater or hand clean with rags on all stainless steel  as soon as possible
Use diluted alkaline detergent
Stainless steel is not acid-proof
Do not use oil


Electronics – Electrical – Machinery

Preservation for Anti-Corrosion / First Aid

CRC 2–26 / 5–56 / 6–66
LPS 1 or 2 / WD 40
or similar
Switchboard, switchgears and starter panels
Generators and electric motors
Instrumentation
CRC 3-36 / LPS 3
grease / engine oil
Machinery
Spare parts and tools


Cleaning Chemicals

Unitor
Aquabreak PX
For soot removal and neutralisation of chlorides
Switchboards and switchgears
Generators and electric motors
Instrumentation
Cleaning of accommodation
Unitor
Aquatuff
For soot removal and neutralisation of chlorides
Engine room cleaning
Unitor
Alkleen Liquid
Removal of heavy stocked soot and paint
Neutralisation of chlorides
Engine room cleaning
Unitor
Metal Brite
Corrosion removal
Electrical and mechanical

 

Contamination from PVC

This is a brief guide to the cause of corrosion due to fire damage by PVC.

When PVC (polyvinyl chloride) is heated to a temperature exceeding approximately 180 degrees centigrade the process of separating and releasing of the different substances including hydrochloric gas starts to take place.

Gas/Acid

Hydrochloride gas follows smoke and air flow. Gradually the temperature decreases further away from the actual fire area. When the temperature falls to approximately 100 degrees centigrade, the gas will condense. Especially on cold surfaces such as metal and in combination with air humidity, the gas becomes hydrochloric acid.

Corrosion

If there is a significant concentration of hydrochloric gas and moisture in the same area, a strong corrosive attack on plain metals will develop. The higher the humidity the more severe the corrosion becomes. In a worst-case scenario the damage may be catastrophic within days if no action is taken.

Chloride Analysis and Project Management

It is important to call ISS Damage Control Norway for chloride analysis and project management upon any suspicion of hydrochloric acid and as soon as possible. We have portable analysis kits and experienced project managers who can carry out assignments worldwide.

First aid can be carried out by the ship’s crew as follows:

  1. Lower the air humidity below 35% RH. This stops the corrosion.
  2. Apply preservation oil so that the chlorides are sealed from air or moisture.

Chlorides are water-soluble and can be neutralised in a water-based alkaline detergent cleaning process. These tasks can be managed and carried out by ISS Damage Control.

Chloride Analysis

When evaluating the analysis results it is important to be aware that a high concentration of chlorides cannot be solely credited to the damage situation.

Sea salt or working with salt acid, chlorine or chemicals containing chlorine may cause a high chlorine concentration, which is normal. This concentration must be taken into account before judging the effect from the fire damage.

 The following figures from our experience can be used for evaluation:

Surface condition Chloride concentration µm/cm2
On surface or in equipment in normal condition 3–5
On surface or in equipment with normal pollution from sea, or light chloride contamination.
Only very sensitive equipment requires cleaning.
5–12
Normal contamination from chlorides.
General cleaning is required.
Decision to clean technical equipment may be taken on site due to conditions.
12–20
Strong contamination from chlorides. Normal with corrosion attack.
Cleaning and neutralisation of any equipment and installation is required.
20 and above